Tweaks

Oct
16

Prioritize or Throttle Network/Internet Bandwidth Speed with Router QoS

Finally! You’ve successfully modified your router and P2P configuration to maximize your active concurrent connections. You’ve even applied the Event 4226 patch to your Windows installation. With these modifications, your file-sharing download speed doubled to 500 kb/sec. But if your ISP theoretically allows 800 kb/sec downloads, why do all of your network applications like VoIP or even just regular Internet browsing suffer? Isn’t the extra 300 kb/sec enough for these speed-sparing programs?

Upstream Saturation

The unused 300 kb/sec is definitely enough. I mean, that speed is practically low-end DSL and people are happy with that! The reason for the drop in connection quality is mainly because of the upload speed. As you know, most household broadband Internet access is asymmetrical. ISPs dedicate more bandwidth for download speed than upload speed. So, even though your cable company is giving you a 6 mbps line, your upload speeds will fall below 1 mbps and most often 500 kbps.

While your download channel is a little more than half used with P2P, your upload channel is totally saturated! With VoIP, you’ll be able to hear callers but they’ll barely be able to understand you. While the downstream speeds will still be fast with your Internet browser, the initial wait from URL + ENTER to page rendering will be extended because the HTTP request takes longer upstream. What do you do? Decrease the P2P upload speed? Not a good idea. Since file-sharing programs typically increase your download speed based on your upload speed, without hacks, the lower you limit your upload speed, the lower the P2P program will decrease your download precedence.

Read the rest of this entry »

Aug
04

Increase the Max Concurrent Port Connections on Your Network

concurrent_verizon.gif So then, you’ve got the “Fastest Package” for the Verizon FiOS ultra high-speed fiber optic. A whooping 50 Mbps download speed and a 20 Mbps upload speed! That means 802.11b WiFi routers won’t even be able to handle those speeds! Nevertheless, that possible 11 Mbps bottleneck should not be your only concern. If you’re going to be utilizing a number of network intensive applications (*coughGnuettllaEmuleBittorrent*) you’ll need to make some other adjustments to your hardware and software network setup. This is one of many things you can do to optimize the network. However, it is the first thing I try to remember when setting up any node or router on my home network.

Possible Names

This setting has many names. You can look for “Maximum Ports,” “Maximum Number of Connections,” “Max Active Links,” “Max Half-open/Duplex Concurrent Connections,” etc. Like the names imply, this setting controls how many connections can be established between nodes. Why is this important? It allows the client computer to contact many more server hosts at the same time. Off the top of my head, this would be beneficial to multi-segment download managers programs like DownThemAll!, Internet browsers (especially with multiple tabs), and (lower voice) P2P file sharing programs.

Read the rest of this entry »

Jun
26

Increase PC Performance by Reducing Shared Video RAM

I don’t know if it’s just me but I think motherboard manufactures changed the way that they handle integrated video memory. I like to buy a new computer every year. Every year around Black Friday, I buy a system on sale and sell my old one on eBay. I think it’s a pretty good setup. You buy the cutting edge equipment and sell what you have before its features phase out of popularity.

Speed Fetish

I do this because I have an obsession with performance. I like to make sure my computers work efficiently. Unfortunately, most computers out of the box are not optimized for performance. They are manufactured with the dumb does-not-know-any-better home user in mind.

Typical performance-boosting tasks I carry out with every new computer I own include doubling the memory, terminating the system restore “feature,” disabling the swap file, and uninstalling the superfluous, “complimentary,” memory-hogging, thread-wasting programs set up by the computer OEM manufacturer. For those who can empathize with me, I absolutely hate WildTangent.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
Latest Post on Loading...: Please Wait...
admin
© 2006 and web design of Allan Ray Barizo from [art] [⁄app].
This site is best viewed with FF and at least 1024x768 resolution.